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29 June 2015

What makes a scrapbook kit work?

After my recent kit post, it occurred to me that what I find relatively easy – pulling together a kit of coordinated supplies – might be difficult for those with less practice or even newcomers to the hobby (more on that below).  Let me admit this to you, dear blog readers, it was not so easy for me at first either.

So let me share a few quick thoughts about this scrap-busting kit.  A refresher on kit making 101, if you will.



A few design concepts come into play here.  Yikes, did I spook you with the very thought.  “Design” is mostly common sense reasons why certain combinations result in a pleasant visual experience, or not.

Continuity – the basis for most of my kits is color continuity.  The easiest way to get it – choose a multi-colored element – paper or an embellishment – and make that the visual starting point.  Simply chose papers that would coordinate with those colors In this kit. I started with the world map paper.

Theme can also provide a continuity to the kit.  I have several travel items included here (papers, banners, journal cards).  I have not overdone it; my kit should work for a variety of subjects.

Contrast -  Some papers were lighter, some darker, some more neutral, some more colorful.  Just add a paper at a time to your main inspiration piece.  You want each addition to look good with the others – but not too similar.  Also vary the patterns with large, medium and small repeats.

For real polish, include some sparkle and shine in among all that flat printed paper – like gold foil on  paper, glitter on the banners, epoxy/metal stickers, transparency cards, glossy flair and enamel dots.

Also, as much as I love color, I ALWAYS make sure I include some good neutrals for grounding.  
That is easy enough to remember for papers, but it applies to embellishments as well.  For example, I included the black alphabet, washi tape and stickers.  Neutrals help the more colorful elements play together nicely.

Cloning - (actually, it is select repetition with variety) – Did I not just say that you did not want it to all look alike.  Well, that is true – but it is also nice to repeat certain things, in different ways. 
  • Example one – maps are repeated on 2 papers, and in the banners.
  • Example two – circles/dots (filled circles, if you will) are repeated in the papers (and the swiss- dot cardstock), with flair and adhesive dots, on the ribbons and even on some of the wood veneer.
  • Example three – gold is used in two specialty pieces of paper and one ribbon.
  • Example four – sweet little flowers appear on a paper and on a flair.
  • Example five – the idea of sunburst is found on the gold embellished paper and the Hello Sunshine flair.
  • Example six – there is wood grain paper as well as wood veneer elements.
"C" how easy it is.  (That S, always with the alliteration!)
By including these complementary supplies in my kit, the designs of individual pages or cards should require much less thought.  That is why kit clubs are so popular; they make it so you almost cannot go wrong.  But the truth is, you too can pull together a kit works.  Your turn . . .

go see do 

PS  This post was also prompted in part by my daughter, who saw my upcoming counterfeit kit for July and commented "well, this is all very color-coordinated".  What is it?

So I was reminded that reviewing the basics is always helpful to those new to the scrapbook fold. Hopefully in the process, I have converted a few of you to my kit making clique!

5 comments:

  1. Always one to make me smile S! Great post.

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  2. Love this post!! LOVING your take on mixing/making kits!!!!!

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  3. Great post!! And good advice from a kit making pro!

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  4. Thanks for the insight into your kit-making process - I enjoyed reading how you put it all together!

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  5. I've always created my own page kits. Plus, it's easy to continue to add to a kit once you've used it as all the coordinating bits and pieces are there. I rarely put things BACK in to my stash!

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